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Category: Lambert News

Lambert News

Magic House Children’s Exhibit at Airport Gets Full Funding

Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is about to get a lot more kid friendly.

Today officials from Lambert, The Magic House St. Louis Children’s Museum, and Rally Saint Louis announced that a 1,500-square-foot, hands-on children’s exhibit has received full funding and approvals to begin construction. This is a $150,000 project.  It will open in late May for the start of the busy summer travel season.

“We’re thrilled to welcome The Magic House’s unparalleled brand of engaging children’s exhibits to the Airport in the C Concourse,” said Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge, Director of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.  “This is just one more element that is helping to build upon the overall airport experience.”

“The Play Port” will feature a transportation hub of fun with climb-in and climb-out venues, including a plane, a train and multiple cars. The play area will also include a child-size air traffic control tower, car rental counters and an airport screening area.

“Traveling with young children can be challenging, and our goal is to create a fun and welcoming experience in St. Louis and convey what a wonderful place the metro area is for families,” said Beth Fitzgerald, President of The Magic House, St. Louis Children’s Museum.  “This has been a longtime dream to use The Magic House’s unique interactive play and learning concepts to welcome and entertain visitors to our airport.” 

City of St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay applauded the idea, as well as the grassroots and corporate support the project received to make it a reality.

“We’re living in a new era of collaboration and innovation across St. Louis,” Mayor Slay said.  “We’re all working to improve our City and region and to see projects coming to fruition through Rally Saint Louis is rewarding, to say the least.”

Major donors and supporters of this exhibit include Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Carr Lane Manufacturing Co., the St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission, Bi-State Development Agency/Metro, Jane and Dave Peacock, as well as private donations generated through Rallystl.org.

After launching in November 2012, the first-of-its-kind platform allows consumers to submit, vote for, and help fund ideas that drive progress in greater St. Louis.  Rally Saint Louis has served as a key player in generating and funding five projects, including The Magic House exhibit, across greater St. Louis, as well as:

“Rally Saint Louis has continued to spark the imagination and civic pride of our fellow St. Louisans,” said Brian Cross, who co-founded Rally Saint Louis alongside partner Aaron Perlut.  “Seeing great projects like this reach funding and become a reality for everyone in the region hopefully will inspire more people to get involved and create the next big thing to make St. Louis even greater.”

Lambert Welcomes New Leadership in Key Executive Positions

Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has filled vacancies for two key executive positions with the promotion of Jerry Beckmann and the addition of Amber Gooding.

Lambert promoted Jerry Beckmann to Deputy Director-Planning & Development after four years as the Airport Assistant Director of Engineering.  Beckmann joins the Senior Executive Team managing Planning and Engineering, Planning Development and Environmental/Safety departments.  Beckmann is responsible for the planning, contracting and execution of all construction projects at Lambert while also coordinating long-range master plan goals for all airfield and airport properties. 

Jerry Beckmann holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering (University of Missouri-Rolla) and a Master’s of Business Administration (University of Missouri-St. Louis).  He became a registered Professional Engineer in 1993.

Lambert also welcomes Amber Gooding to the staff as the Airport Assistant Director of DBE Programs. Amber Gooding is responsible for managing the City of St. Louis and Lambert Airport’s Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) and M/WBE certification and compliance programs. These programs promote business opportunities for disadvantaged, minority and women businesses for Airport and City departments.

Amber Gooding has more than 25 years of experience in business development across several industries including healthcare, aviation and government.  Gooding was most recently the President/CEO of Diverse Resources, LLC, a consulting firm aimed at supporting business development for small, minority and women-owned businesses.  Prior to that position, she was the Director of Business Diversity Development at the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority from 2007-2012. She was responsible for leading all aspects of the Airport Authority’s federally mandated Disadvantaged Business Enterprise and Airport Concessions (ACDBE) programs.

Amber Gooding holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics and Finance (Christian Brothers University) and a Master’s in Business Administration (Lipscomb University) with a concentration in leadership and organizational development.

Blue Oasis: Lambert Photo of the Week

A crew from Missouri Terrazzo lays down a punch of color this week in the Terminal 1 Ticketing Lobby.

The Terminal 1 renovations at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport have featured sky white ceilings, walls and flooring. But this week, a punch of color was added to the mix of this major interior makeover. All new terrazzo flooring has been poured in stages over the last two years on the ticketing level. Terrazzo, which gives off a granite-like appearance, is made with a cementious mix of epoxy and aggregate such as marble, sea shells, plate glass, mirrors and other materials. For the final major pour of on the ticketing level, Lambert turned the mix blue for a new rest and relaxation area. This new terminal oasis will feature other eye-catching amenities as well, which will be revealed in coming weeks.

Foundry Art Centre Opens Whimsical Art Exhibit, Rat Race, at Lambert

The Foundry Art Centre & Lambert St. Louis-International Airport present an exhibition of whimsical artwork, Rat Race, now through February 23, 2014. Read the rest of entry »

Lambert’s Terminal Recycling Program Doubles Output in 2013

A comprehensive terminal and concourse recycling program at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has already seen output double in the first six months since it was implemented earlier this year. Lambert expects to increase output even more with the roll out this week of dozens of combined single-stream recycling and trash containers for all public areas in the terminals, concourses and parking garages. Read the rest of entry »

Historic Aircraft Returns to Lambert with New Digital Exhibit

After a two year hiatus, a historic plane once owned by Charles Lindbergh has returned to Lambert-St. Louis International Airport to hang once again over the C Concourse Checkpoint in Terminal 1. The Missouri History Museum completed a nine-hour installation of the 1934 D-127 Monocoupe aircraft on Sunday, Oct. 20. Wings and other equipment were attached onsite prior to raising the plane into position. The Museum is sharing the experience of the complicated installation through a time lapse video.

The Missouri History Museum has also installed a new interactive history kiosk which is in line-of-sight of the aircraft from the upper level of Terminal 1 overlooking the checkpoint atrium. The kiosk displays the history of Lambert and Charles Lindbergh and also chronicles the efforts by the Museum to save and exhibit this historic aircraft over the years, including its most recent restoration.

The plane was removed in March of 2011 to make way for terminal renovations. During that time, the Missouri history Museum conducted a historic conservation effort of the aircraft, which included preserving the aircraft’s original fabric skin. The Monocoupe was originally installed at Lambert in 1979. The accumulation of dust and other airborne pollutants over 30 years made it necessary for the plane to undergo a complete conservation effort in order to ensure the continued preservation of the aircraft. Stress fractures along several seams in the plane’s fabric covering and the tears caused by general wear required professional attention.

Charles Lindbergh’s Monocoupe plane was built by Lambert Aircraft Corporation in August 1934. It was just one of three planes built completely in St. Louis by the company. He donated it to the Missouri History Museum in 1940.

Missouri History Museum Returning Lindbergh Monocoupe to Lambert Terminal 1

Charles Lindbergh’s plane, which had previously hung in Terminal 1 at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport since 1979 (see left), returns to its place of welcoming passengers to the St. Louis airport. Lindbergh’s 1934 Model D–127 Monocoupe, an iconic symbol to many St. Louis travelers, has been absent for more than two years because of terminal renovations. The plane will be reinstalled late Saturday, October 19. 

Over the course of its more than 30 years hanging in Lambert, the monocoupe was been exposed to dust and other airborne pollutants along with the stress of being suspended from the ceiling. The cumulative effect of these conditions made it necessary for the plane to undergo a complete conservation effort in order to ensure the continued preservation of the aircraft. Stress fractures along several seams in the plane’s fabric covering and the tears caused by general wear required professional attention. When Lambert announced that Terminal 1 would be renovated, the Missouri History Museum worked with Lambert to remove the plane and use the time needed to complete the renovations to conserve the plane.

Charles Lindbergh’s Monocoupe plane was built by Lambert Aircraft Corporation in August 1934 and was one of the first three planes built completely in St. Louis by the company. Lindbergh donated the plane to the Missouri History Museum in 1940.

Before Lindbergh’s plane was placed on display in at Lambert Airport in 1979, Museum staff studied it and found that they had to deal with some issues. They contacted the local Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter 32, and with the help of the McDonnell Douglas Corporation, the plane was prepared for long-term display.

Preserving Lindbergh’s Legacy

Late in March 2011, Museum employees, including Curator Sharon Smith and Conservator Linda Landry, assisted specialty contractors with moving the Monocoupe from Lambert to a storage hangar. Little did they know that a mere two weeks later a tornado would rip through the airport, damaging the very spot where the Monocoupe had hung since 1979.

Conservator Linda Landry managed the conservation effort.  Test results revealed that the fabric of the Lindbergh Monocoupe was the original 1934 aircraft skin. This is exceedingly rare for an aircraft to have maintained its original covering for so long. Once the age of the fabric and covering was established, all effort was made to retain the historic integrity of the plane.

The Monocoupe was constructed using “fabric and dope,” a process still used today. Historic materials and the passage of time create unique challenges for preservation and conservation. In this type of construction, fabric is fitted over the frame and then covered with several layers of airplane dope, a lacquer that is used to protect, waterproof, and make taut the cloth surfaces of airplanes. As the dope dries it shrinks, causing the material to stretch tightly over the frame, creating a smooth surface. Unfortunately, the dope never stops shrinking, so over the years the ever-tightening fabric can put pressure on the framework until the fabric either tears to relieve the stress or weaker parts of the interior structure snap.

Landry and her conservation lab assistant Cailin Carter performed the conservation treatment. The conservation team repaired seams and tears with precision patches and paint compounds. A full inch by inch cleaning of the interior and exterior of the plane was undertaken to remove nearly 34 years of accumulated contaminants.

New T1 Bag Claim Entrance/Exit to Open after Renovation

The makeover of Terminal 1 entrances that connect the Bag Claim level with Arrivals Drive at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is moving to the second and final phase.

On Tuesday, Oct 1, Lambert will re-open Terminal 1 Entry/Exit 17 which has been renovated with new sleek, all-glass enclosed walkways. Entry/Exit 17 is the main exit for the passenger pick- up zone, car rental shuttles and hotel shuttles.

Also on Tuesday, Lambert will close Terminal 1 Entry/Exit 12 which will also be fully renovated with the same glass and steel architecture over the walkways. The second phase of construction will close one lane of traffic near the work zone.  The loading zone for Super Park shuttles and the Terminal 2 Shuttle, normally located on the curb of the terminal, will be moved to the center island on Arrivals Drive during construction. The project is slated to be completed in three to four months, weather permitting.

The new all-glass enclosed walkways will better enhance Lambert’s historic terminal architecture. The project is being funded with support from the Eastman Chemical Company. The glass panels will allow natural lighting to brighten the pathway for the public to and from the lower level Bag Claim. Eastman’s Saflex® and Vanceva® interlayers bring safety, security and UV protection to the laminated glass. LLumar® decorative window films provide a distinct design pattern to the enclosed walkways.

Anheuser-Busch Honors Budweiser with New Airport Concept

The iconic history of Budweiser comes alive in St. Louis with the new bar & restaurant concept at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. EIGHTEEN|76, now open in Lambert’s Concourse E in Terminal 2 (Gate E10), pays homage to the founding year of Budweiser, first brewed in the original St. Louis Anheuser-Busch brewery and still brewed there today.

EIGHTEEN|76 is the first airport location for this nostalgic concept which will feature mural accents of Budweiser history with an interior finish that features beechwood, brick and dark metal finishes. A reclaimed aged beech­­wood and stainless steel bar are highlighted with bright re­d seats and accent lighting.

The new concept was developed in partnership with Lambert-St. Louis International Airport and HMSHost, the master food concessionaire at the airport, with valuable input from Anheuser-Busch.

“The city of St. Louis has a great deal of history and HMSHost is proud to help honor this with the opening of EIGHTEEN|76,” said HMSHost Vice President of Business Development Stephen Douglas. “Bringing EIGHTEEN|76 to Terminal 2 provides travelers with an authentic St. Louis experience and a taste of local culture.”  

The bar features nearly a dozen beers in both draft and bottles. EIGHTEEN|76 will also have a top flight wine list. Drinks can be paired with complementary menu items like the roast beef hero sandwich, Gus’ pressed pretzel (with Shock Top Belgian White mustard), farm house cheese plates, steakhouse caprese salad and roasted red pepper hummus with grilled garlic flatbread.   

To celebrate the opening of EIGHTEEN|76 on September 24, Anheuser-Busch gave passengers and airport visitors a unique surprise in Terminal 2. One of the Budweiser Clydesdales made a special appearance inside the ticketing level of Terminal 2 to greet both arriving and departing passengers. 

Eddie Bauer Brings Fresh Look and Designs to Lambert Airport

The legendary Eddie Bauer has expanded into the airport frontier with Lambert-St. Louis International Airport as the newest home for the retailer offering classic outdoor sportswear, business casual apparel and accessories.  

The new Eddie Bauer at Lambert is only the second airport location in the country, located in the C Concourse adjacent to Gate C6.  The store is one of the keystone changes in a year-long retail makeover by the Hudson Group (JG-St. Louis JV) which became the primary news, gifts and specialty concessionaire at Lambert in February. 

The 1,500 sq. ft. Eddie Bauer store features an iconic timber and stone entrance with a rustic wood theme interior that offers the perfect backdrop for a large mix of clothing and gear for men and women.  The Lambert Eddie Bauer store will feature polo’s, blouses, dress shirts, sports shirts, sweaters, pants, shorts, jeans, jackets, fleece, accessories, watches and a collection of backpacks and travel duffels.

Hudson is in its final phase of launching new brands and renovating all retail locations in Lambert terminals and concourses. The launch began with the opening of its flagship Hudson travel convenience store (news, magazines, books, snacks, technology) which is now in multiple locations at the Airport. Earlier this summer, Hudson opened Natalie’s Candy Jar in Concourse C and E as well as a Maxiga in Concourse A. Other new stores include Discover St. Louis, Kids Works, Bliss, Spectacles and Ebony News. A  CNN Newsstand in Concourse E will open later this fall.

“Eddie Bauer just adds to a great mix of new, bright and attractive stores at Lambert,” said Airport Director, Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge. “The retail transformation isn’t complete but we’ve already seen great results from the opening of each new store. We’ve received very favorable responses and reviews from our customers so far.”

Lambert Airport in St. Louis, MO serves nearly 13 million passengers annually with 250 daily flights to 60 non-stop destinations.  

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